Can Hypnosis or NLP Help?

How Does Hypnosis Work? QuitSmoking LV uses both hypnosis and NLP. Hypnosis is just a state of light relaxation where you can access and focus on the part of your mind (the unconscious) that controls habits like smoking. Your relaxing, (with the therapist’s guidance) creates a slightly altered state of awareness where your subconscious mind can accept positive suggestions or reinforcements about what you want to do. But you DO have to want to stop smoking in the first place because we can’t “make you” want to! There are SO many misconceptions about hypnosis, it’s probably helpful to also tell you what it is NOT: Hypnosis is NOT a deep ‘trance’ where someone is “controlling your mind”. During hypnosis, you are aware of everything going on, because you are only RELAXED, not asleep or knocked out somehow. And, there is no such thing as getting ‘stuck’ in hypnosis. If hypnosis could ‘control your mind’, then any hynotherapist could walk in to the nearest bank and ‘make’ the teller give them all the money, but that just doesn’t happen. Hypnosis does NOT put you to sleep, and won’t make you feel ‘sleepy’ or groggy. Contrary to what you’ve seen in movies when hypnotherapists wave a pocketwatch in front of someone and say “you’re getting sleepy”, it doesn’t work that way at all. When you are fully and completely hypnotized, you should feel about as relaxed AND AS FULLY AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS as when you get a nice massage. When done properly, you won’t actually feel like you were ‘hypnotised’ at all – because the only thing you should feel...

For Healthcare Professionals

“The health care system has long been recognized as a logical and potentially productive means of reaching smokers with a cessation message and promoting their successful cessation. Approximately 70 percent of smokers see a physician each year, creating the potential to reach large numbers of smokers with a cessation message. The fraction of patients who report having been advised in the last year by their physician to quit smoking remains too low…” – National Cancer Institute’s monograph: Population Based Smoking Cessation: Proceedings of a Conference on What Works to Influence Cessation in the General Population After reading this section, please consider reviewing the remainder of the website with respect to possible areas of concern with your patient population. Are there frequent excuses your population use to not start a smoking cessation program? Are there some statistics you feel might benefit your patients when you talk with them? Please feel free to email any questions, concerns, comments or additions. Our goal is to help people stop smoking. Your help as a healthcare provider, this website, these methods, pharmacologic / nutritional assistance, and a good support system will increase your patients’ long-term smoking cessation success rate. Why should we be concerned with having our patients stop smoking now? The problem is only half of people with the most common lung disease of smokers, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD), are clinically recognized. It is estimated 10%-15% of people over the age of 55 have significant COPD. Smoking is the major contributor to this. As you know, COPD is irreversible. Once you have it, it is progressive and cannot be cured. There currently...

Why Is It So Hard To Quit?

You need to remember your smoking habit has been developed over a number of years. It is a “facilitated” process. You were not born a smoker. No one is genetically inclined to smoke. You were NOT predetermined to be a cigarette smoker. There might be genetic vulnerability to dependence or obsessive compulsive issues but not specifically to smoking or tobacco use. Usually in the teenage / adolescent years you started thinking about smoking. You started experimenting with it. You may have started to use regularly: on the weekends, several days a week, every day. You started off “bumming” cigarettes from your friends. You smoked only a few cigarettes a day but it was now time to supply your own cigarettes. Maybe you became the supplier and shared with your friends. A few cigarettes turned into a half a pack. May be up to a full pack. But do you remember? It’s a little difficult to quantify how much you were smoking back then because you bought a pack of cigarettes. Some were for you, some for your friends. You ran out so you used some of your friends’ cigarettes until you could get another pack. When did you start buying cigarettes by the carton? This is adolescence / early adulthood. 90 percent of smokers started by the age of 21, and half of them became regular smokers by their 18th birthday. Everyday, approximately 4,000 children between 12 and 17 years of age smoke their first cigarette; an estimated 1,300 of them will become regular smokers. Half of them will ultimately die from their habit. Then you transitioned from regular...

Rules And Reasons For Smoking Cessation

1) Smoking is a stimulant NOT a relaxant 2) Components of tobacco smoke cause disease and death 3) I am in control 4) I am NOT weak 5) Smoking is a thing of the past This should be your mantra. You should repeat these Rules many times throughout the day. If I were to meet you on the street and asked you about the “Rules,” you should be able to recite them as if you were telling me your phone number. If you want to add your most important personal reason(s) for quitting smoking, please do so. YOUR SMOKING STORY What is your story / personal experience of how you started smoking? Do you remember your first cigarette? Was it pleasant? Who were you with? Do you even still know them? Did you feel pressured? Did you want that first cigarette? Did you like that first cigarette? Did you think in your wildest dreams smoking would become a habit? Did you tell yourself “There is no way this will become a habit for me, they are too disgusting?” When did you transition from a “starter” to a casual smoker? To a regular smoker? To a dependent / habitual smoker? PERSONAL MOTIVATIONAL LISTS FOR SUCCESS Why did you start smoking? It looked cool – James Dean, the Marlboro Man. By the way, two of the most famous Marlboro Men, Wayne McLaren and David McLean, died of lung cancer. My family smoked The most common first cigarette is from a brother / sister or friend. My friends smoked / Peer pressure, to fit in. It was the “social” thing to do...

How Is Your Life Controlled By Smoking

Smoking Triggers – Situations/places to avoid or change, smoking-associated habits Be honest with yourself. Make sure if it’s an unavoidable place to have a solution to change the environment slightly. You need to break smoking patterns / routines. Who of your family and friends can you call upon to provide emotional support? Consider activities incompatible with smoking such as running, skiing, swimming. Do not use cigarettes as a reward. Even one cigarette decreases your success and increases relapse. See Coping Mechanisms in the next section. While talking on the phone. Solution: talk in a different room, hold the phone in the other hand, sit in a different chair. Keep your hands and mouth occupied with sugarless candy or gum. Keep a squeeze-ball handy. Stand instead of sit. Limit the amount of time spent on the phone. While in your “favorite chair.” Solution: Avoid that chair or move it to another location. Rearrange your furniture. Restaurants, bars and nightclubs. Fortunately many are nonsmoking these days. However, it doesn’t stop you from taking a smoking break outside. If unavoidable, go with a supportive friend. Avoid busy hours where there is increased smoke. Consider changing your usual meal. While drinking. This can be alcoholic or caffeinated beverages. Break the smoking pattern: if you drink out of a certain glass, mug, or cup, change to a different one. If you drink in a certain location of your home or at a certain restaurant, change that location. Consider reducing or eliminating alcohol for the first few weeks during the cessation process. Consider alternative ways to socialize with friends for a few weeks. Limit yourself...

Smoking Cessation Personal Planner Sheet

THIS PERSONAL PLANNER FOR SMOKING CESSATION SUCCESS BELONGS TO: ______________________________________________ RIPI – Reflect, Indentify, Plan, Initiate Age I started smoking: __________________ Maximum number of packs I smoked in a day (for at least 3-6 months) __________________ (Be honest, this is your Personal Planner for Success) Number of years I’ve smoked (current age minus the age you started) __________________ (Do not subtract years you were smoke-free unless you quit for 10-15 years before starting again) Number of “Pack Years” I’ve smoked (Maximum packs per day multiplied by number years smoked). (20 Pack Years is significant but I’ve had patients well over 100 Pack Years!) __________________ Date I was sure I was ready to quit smoking (your Quit Date): __________________ Date I started My Planner / formulating my plan: __________________ Date I started A+ Smoker‘s Control® (the night before your Quit Date): __________________ Date I was comfortable stopping A+ Smoker’s Control®: __________________ Date I told the first person “I’m an EX-smoker”:...